Pocket Tools

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This section is a tough one. I face two separate problems:

First, the concept of what constitutes a "pocket tool" is necessarily subjective. For the purpose of this section, I'm going to (arbitrarily) limit myself to tools that actually fit in your pocket, are suitable for daily carry, and include (1) a knife blade, (2) one or more screwdriver blades, (3) and either pliers or scissors.

Second, while I would like to be able to provide multiple photographs comparing the tools to each other in size and function, I find that I tend to give away tools that I don't use. This means that I'll get a tool, play with it and/or carry it for awhile, and then I dispose of it. I'll use stock photos of tools I no longer have, but try to make comparisons based on the manufacturer's descriptions and my own recollections of what they were/are like.

I've broken several of my tools and will point this out when it is relevant, but this doesn't mean that any of the other similar tools would not have broken under the same circumstances. As they say, "mileage may vary from driver to driver...."

Gerber Clutch

This is what I currently carry everyday (May of 2007). I gave away my Squirt P4 a few weeks ago, after carrying it faithfully for over two years, and then decided to try something else. The Clutch has virtually the same tool set as the Squirt P4, except that the awl on the P4 is replaced with a set of non-removable tweezers on the Clutch and the file on the P4 is more of a "work file" than a nail file. In spite of the fact that the Clutch is slightly larger in overall dimensions (with the exception of thickness, where the rivets on the P4 make it slightly thicker than the Clutch), the Clutch feels about the same size in your pocket. One of the contributing factors is that the two largest blades, the knife and nail file, are scalloped at one side to keep the profile of the Clutch more rounded. The blades and tools themselves are significantly larger on the Clutch, making it easier to work with. The knife blade, for example, is at least 1/8" longer and 50% wider on the Clutch. The Clutch blades and tools (except for the pliers) are also polished, where the blades and tools of the P4 have a rougher, brushed finish. The Clutch is assembled with screws (star-Torx heads) and the P4 is riveted, making it possible to disassemble the Clutch, but not the P4.

Taking all factors into consideration, I think it's a toss-up between the Clutch and the P4. On last factor in favor of the Clutch is that it is apparently normally-priced at only $15 at Target and some other stores, whereas the Squirt P4 is usually closer to $20 or even more. I rank these #1 and #2 in my list, but I'm not going to let myself be pinned down to ranking one above the other.

UPDATE: OK, I just gave my Clutch away to someone. I'm replacing it with another Squirt P4, so I guess that tells you how I feel about the P4 in comparison to the Clutch.

  • QUALITY: Typical Gerber quality, with durable finish and polished blades and tools. Using screws, instead of rivets, to assemble the Clutch is also a nice touch.
  • PERFORMANCE: Does everything I want it to very nicely.
  • PROS: Surprisingly large blades and tools, feels much smaller than expected when carrying in pocket, assembled with screws instead of rivets, durable finish, blades and tools open easily, pliers are practical, Phillips screwdriver has a nice profile for working with real screws, inexpensive compared to other similar tools, has nail file and blade labeled on tool.
  • CONS: Does not have a "real" file (just a nail file), knife blade is a bit thin in cross-section, no screwdriver blade small enough for working on glasses frames.
  • VALUE: Surprisingly low-priced for the value and features.
  • OVERALL OPINION: Good competitor for the Leatherman Squirt P4 at a lower price.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Gerber Eclipse

    I carried an Eclipse very briefly, but found that I needed pliers more than I needed scissors. The Eclipse feels very comfortable in your pocket, with its rounded edges and thin cross-section, but you pay for this in the compromises made to make the blades and tools conform to the rounded profiles. The blades and tools are just a bit eccentric, though they (mostly) work OK. The Eclipse places primary emphasis on the function of the scissors and subordinates everything else. Since I didn't really need the scissors, I sort of soured to the whole design. As with all Gerber products, the finish and quality are above average and the Eclipse is actually quite attractive. One feature that I definitely didn't like was the "clamping" action used to attach the Eclipse to a key chain or ring. When you rotate the handles closed, part of the scissors assembly below the pivot will close on a key chain or ring to hold the tool in place. Since I keep a Photon Micro LED flashlight attached to my pocket tools, this meant that I ended up detaching the flashlight each time I opened the scissors. This was cumbersome and something I didn't want to do.

    I believe that Gerber has discontinued the Eclipse, though you can still find them at a variety of on-line sites.

  • QUALITY: Very good quality of construction, with polished parts and a nice blue finish.
  • PERFORMANCE: Scissors work fine, but the other blades and tools are somewhat marginal.
  • PROS: Good scissors, cute method of opening, parts are nicely polished, action is smooth, feels good in your pocket.
  • CONS: Blades and tools are compromised in favor of the scissors, key chain/ring attachment has to be released each time the scissors are opened, doesn't really have any way to work on Phillips-head screws effectively.
  • VALUE: Expensive for the performance.
  • OVERALL OPINION: Well, I gave it away, so that tells you something. I replaced this with a Leatherman Squirt P4.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Leatherman Juice C2

    The Juice C2 is actually a fine little pocket tool, but I can do virtually the same tasks with the much-smaller Squirt P4. The Juice has a much-better Phillips-head screwdriver blade than the P4, and it has a corkscrew. Other than that, the differences are basically those of size. The Juice does NOT have a "work" file, like the P4 does, which is actually a strike against it. That aside, the finish and quality are way above-average and the tools and blades are very utilitarian. If you're thinking about a many-bladed Swiss Army knife, you'll probably find that the Juice is roughly the same size, but much more durable and functional. The Juice, like the Squirt, comes in several different types, including the S2, which takes away the corkscrew and replaces it with scissors. The CS2 sort of combines the features of the C2 and the S2, and then the XE2 adds just about everything else that could possibly be added. Personally, I'd probably pick the CS2, as it is a combination of pliers, scissors, and just about everything else I'm likely to need, yet it's still relatively thin.

    But, for the meantime, I'm sticking with the much-smaller Squirt P4 or the Gerber Clutch.

  • QUALITY: Good overall quality, with tight construction and attractive anodized finish on the handles.
  • PERFORMANCE: Stays tight even after extended use. Tools and blades work very well.
  • PROS: Combines several tools and features not available on other pocket tools of the same size, solid construction, realistically-sized pliers and knife blade, fairly smooth profile for carrying.
  • CONS: A bit expensive, bigger tool than I really want to carry.
  • VALUE: These usually sell for more than $45 on-line, which makes them significantly more expensive than the Squirt P4 (about $30) or the Gerber Clutch (about $20). This is to be expected, but it is still a bit more than I want to spend on a pocket tool. When a Clutch goes for $14.95 at Target, it's hard to get motivated to spend three times as much for basically similar features.
  • OVERALL OPINION: A good option, but bigger than what I normally want to carry in my pocket. I'll stick with a Clutch or a P4.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Leatherman Micra

    The Leatherman Micra is longer than a Leatherman Squirt P4 and S4, but a bit thinner. When you set the Micra down next to the S4, the impression you get is that the Micra is a "Neanderthal S4" that has not quite been civilized. The comparison is unfair, since the Micra is constructed entirely of stainless steel, instead of a combination of steel and aluminum like the Squirts, and does not sport a painted or anodized finish. Still, there's a lot to recommend the Micra. The scissors work very well for many tasks, from sewing to cutting heavy cardboard. The Micra includes a pair of non-removable tweezers and a nice assortment of flat and Phillips-head screw blades. The backs of the handles are impressed with a measuring scale in both imperial and metric units. (The scales is about 5" long, but it is a bit awkward to use it at that length since you must balance the handles in a half-open position and the handles move slightly to affect the measurements.) I've never tried to take the tool apart, but it appears that it is assembled with screws instead of rivets. One nice touch is that the lanyard ring actually folds completely into the tool, so it does not need to project if you do not intend to use it.

    This is a really a nice pocket tool, though it does look a bit primitive. Many users rave about their Micras. Unfortunately, I really don't need to carry scissors and would prefer pliers. The Micra does not come in a version with pliers. Therefore, it stays in my drawer most of the time.

  • QUALITY: 100% stainless steel, with a nice finish and good fitting.
  • PERFORMANCE: Tools and blades work very well for their size. The scissors are actually about the best I've used for the overall size of the tool...very tough.
  • PROS: Very solid construction, assembled with screws (I believe), great scissors, includes tweezers that are actually useful, ruler on backs of handles, not too darn expensive, lanyard ring folds into handle.
  • CONS: No pliers, rather plain appearance, ruler stretches across pivot and reduces accuracy.
  • VALUE: These sell for around $25 on-line and they're not a bad deal at that price.
  • OVERALL OPINION: This would probably be one of my favorites if it had a version with pliers. It's obvious, though, that the design of the Micra won't accommodate pliers in place of the scissors. But if you need scissors, consider this in place of the Juice S2 or the Squirt S4.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Leatherman Mini Bear-Jaws

    The Mini Bear-Jaws, little brother of the Bear-Jaws, looks like a Micra that wanted to become a Squirt P4. With pliers instead of scissors, it would seem to be a contender for my attention, but the Mini Bear-Jaws just don't cut it for me. The tools and blades are rather limited when compared to those of the Micra (six blades, including the tweezers, on the Micra compared to four blades on the Bear-Jaws) and the pliers just don't seem to be as functionally-shaped as with the Squirt P4. A scale is impressed on one side of the handles and it is actually much more practical than the scale on the Micra. The small screwdriver is also a very useful tool, but the rest just don't seem to measure up. The knife blade is more of a drop-point shape than those of the other Leatherman pocket tools and the main screwdriver blade is too "Phillips-shaped" for slotted screws and too "slot-shaped" for Phillips screws.

    These are often included in tool sets sold by Leatherman...buy a Bear-Jaws and get a Mini Bear-Jaws for FREE! I believe I got mine with a flashlight I bought somewhere. I keep it in my car, but hardly ever use it anymore.

  • QUALITY: 100% stainless steel, though it seems a bit rough and unfinished. Not on a par with the Micra. (It may be that the newer ones have a better finish, as mine is about ten years old.)
  • PERFORMANCE: All the tools seem to be slightly below-average in performance...just not quite what they should be.
  • PROS: Very solid construction, assembled with screws, has pliers, all stainless steel, scale works fine, small screwdriver blade is great.
  • CONS: Individual blades and tools are below-average, handles are not comfortable when using pliers, main screwdriver blade is very inferior, only four blades, head of pliers is kind of rough.
  • VALUE: As a free bonus with a set, it's not too bad, but I would not buy it separately for more than $8.
  • OVERALL OPINION: As you can probably tell by now, I'm not very enthused about this tool. It's just sort of "blah"...doing nothing very well. While I like having a pair of pliers, the lack of good screwdriver blades really puts this tool in the "second-rate" bin.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Leatherman Mini-Tool

    You can still get these on-line, but I don't think that Leatherman makes them anymore. They are listed on the Leatherman site as being a "retired" tool...if so, there must be a whole heck of a lot of them out there in boxes somewhere. Anyway, this is a 100% stainless steel tool with some nice features. You get pliers instead of scissors and some neat fold-out tools. In particular, the bottle opener is very nicely-designed. The one big issue I have with this is that you have to open the handles to access the blades. This also means that the handles are open towards your hands when you use the pliers. This is slightly uncomfortable and hard on your palm, but not too bad. Plus...it has a nice file. I actually like this tool quite a bit more than I do the Mini Bear-Jaws, so it's really too bad that it's been "retired". If you have a chance to get one at a decent price, give it a try.

  • QUALITY: Nicely made, but the finish is not up to that of the more recent pocket tools.
  • PERFORMANCE: A robust tool with neat features. The open edges of the handles are a turn-off, but you can cope with that.
  • PROS: Has file and pliers (my personal favorites), robust all-steel design, wire-cutter works well, bottle opener is cool.
  • CONS: Open edges of handles on pliers can wear on your palms, no Phillips-head screwdriver, knife blade is kind of dinky for the size of the tool, tend to be expensive (when you can find them).
  • VALUE: There appear to be a lot of these around still to be sold, but they usually sell for around $30. This is a bit high for what you get.
  • OVERALL OPINION: A near-miss for Leatherman. This is a nice tool to have handy, but it can be irritating to use it on a regular basis. For $30, you can do much better.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Leatherman Squirt P4

    I carried the P4 for over two years and just recently gave mine away. I replaced it with a Gerber Clutch, which is, in my opinion, its closest competitor. The P4 has just about the "perfect" complement of tools for me, including pliers and a real two-sided file. It's a tiny little thing, about the same size as a Swiss Army Classic, but with a lot more utility. You can also get the Squirt in other styles, including the Squirt S4, which has scissors instead of pliers and a small pair of removable tweezers in place of the file. Since I'd rather have the pliers, I stick with the P4, even though I do own an S4. The size and shape of the knife blade are virtually identical to the Swiss Army Classic, though the polished finish on the Classic is superior to the finish on the P4. The Squirts are assembled with rivets instead of screws, which I consider a minor strike against them. The overall quality is excellent, though, and my P4s have held up pretty well. (I broke my previous P4 trying to wiggle a piece of rod enough to break it. I just kept torquing the pliers until one of the jaws snapped off. This was definitely abuse, and I didn't try to convince Leatherman to replace it under the warranty.) The two-sided file blade is really a big plus in my book. Even though it's small, it really comes in handy when working on metals or plastics. Each side has a different cut.

    As I wrote above, I'd definitely rank the Squirt P4 and the Gerber Clutch as #1 and #2 on my list, but I won't give one the nod over the other. (Notice in the linked pictures how I broke the jaw off of one of my P4s by abusing it.)

    UPDATE: I just switched back to carrying a P4 after giving away my Gerber Clutch. I think that I do prefer the P4 to the Clutch.

  • QUALITY: Very strong for a small tool. Unlike a swiss Army Classic, this tool is constructed of steel and aluminum and can really take a beating.
  • PERFORMANCE: The P4 has everything I could ask for in a small tool.
  • PROS: Small size, great file, blades and tools are easy to access, wire cutter works very well for size, lanyard attachment swivels around blade pivot, small screwdriver blade is very small and will work on screws in eyeglass frames and other small slotted screws.
  • CONS: Assembled with rivets instead of screws, tools and blades are sometimes a fraction too small for what I need. Phillips screwdriver tool is only adequate, a bit high-priced.
  • VALUE: Good value for the money, but not as good a value as the Gerber Clutch.
  • OVERALL OPINION: A favorite of mine. You sometimes feel that it's about 25% smaller than what you need, but it almost always does the trick for you. The file is super.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Leatherman Squirt S4

    This is the sibling of the P4 that I passed over, though I own one and sometimes use it. The S4 is basically a scissors version of the P4, with a couple other minor changes, such as the replacement of the two-sided file with a pair of tweezers. Everything that can be said about the P4 is also true of the S4. It's a very compact tool with a lot going for it. If I misplace my P4, I may grab the S4 and go. I just don't need the scissors or the tweezers.

  • QUALITY: Very strong for a small tool. Unlike a swiss Army Classic, this tool is constructed of steel and aluminum and can really take a beating.
  • PERFORMANCE: The S4 has many things going for it...if you want scissors and tweezers.
  • PROS: Small size, blades and tools are easy to access, scissors work very well for size, lanyard attachment swivels around blade pivot, small screwdriver blade is very small and will work on screws in eyeglass frames and other small slotted screws.
  • CONS: Assembled with rivets instead of screws, tweezers are marginal (less useful than the pliers on the P4), tools and blades are sometimes a fraction too small for what I need. Phillips screwdriver tool is only adequate, a bit high-priced.
  • VALUE: Good value for the money, but not as good a value as the Micra, if you need scissors.
  • OVERALL OPINION: It's hard not to like the S4, which shares many good qualities with the P4. Take your pick depending upon your needs.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Swiss Army
    (Victorinox) Classic SD

    These are everywhere. This is the classic (no pun intended) personal Swiss army knife: small blade, scissors, nail file, tweezers, and toothpick. These sell for anywhere from $8 to $20. These just barely make it into my list, as the nail file blade is actually supposed to double as a screwdriver. I will confirm that it DOES work as a screwdriver, though it's pretty marginal in most jobs. The Classic SD also comes in a different version (the Classic) that does away with the screwdriver tip and just makes it a nail cleaner, which is probably just as well. While Swiss Army knives are finished very well and feel great in your pocket, they just don't have the solid feel that I expect from a working tool. There's that little extra bit of flex in the frame when you try to torque down a screw, for example. It's easy to see why that would be the case, if you compare the frame of a Swiss Army Classic SD with, say, a Squirt S4. The spacers in the frame of the S4 are 3-4 times as thick as those in the Swiss Army Classic SD. Don't get me wrong...I have tremendous respect for both the Wenger and Victorinox versions of the knives, but the fact is that they're not really intended to be whipped out to do real work except on infrequent occasions.

  • QUALITY: Beautiful finish and quality of build.
  • PERFORMANCE: Not up to frequent use or tough jobs.
  • PROS: Very small, sharp cutting surfaces, red color makes it easy to locate and difficult to misplace, very smooth profile in pocket, relatively inexpensive and available at many locations.
  • CONS: Basic tools and nothing more, scissors only good for hangnails and loose threads, screwdriver function is pretty useless.
  • VALUE: A pretty good value for under $10 (they're often on sale for $10 or less).
  • OVERALL OPINION: The Mini-Champ is almost as small as the Classic SD, but is much more useful. Unfortunately, it is significantly more expensive and does not go "on sale" very often at most vendors and on-line locations.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Swiss Army
    (Victorinox) Mini-Champ (I)

    There's a Mini-Champ and a Mini-Champ II...this is about the original Mini-Champ I have. The difference between the models is in the assortment of tools and blades. (Check out the picture of the newer Mini-Champ II on the linked page here.) The Mini-Champ II adds a bottle-opener and changes some blade locations.

    Like all Swiss Army tools, the finish and fit on this tool are way above average. But see my comments above on the strength of construction and the robustness of the frame. I think that I would feel confident carrying this tool only if I were also carrying something like the Swiss+Tech Micro-Plus 8-in-1.

  • QUALITY: Beautiful finish and quality of build.
  • PERFORMANCE: Not up to frequent use or tough jobs.
  • PROS: Very small, sharp cutting surfaces, red color makes it easy to locate and difficult to misplace, very smooth profile in pocket, nice assortment of lightweight tools.
  • CONS: Basic tools and nothing more, scissors only good for hangnails and loose threads, obviously intended for use by a "gentleman".
  • VALUE: Fairly expensive (over $30) for limited functionality, but suitable for use in the office.
  • OVERALL OPINION: The Mini-Champ is almost as small as the Classic SD, but is much more useful. Unfortunately, it is significantly more expensive and does not go "on sale" very often at most vendors and on-line locations.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Swiss Army
    (Wenger) Tradesman

    When compared to the Classic SD and the Mini-Champ (above), the Tradesman is downright robust, with a significantly thicker frame. But it is still not up to the level of most dedicated pocket tools of similar size. The screwdrivers are very useful and the pliers work well for their size. I chose this particular model because it had what I could actually use, but no more than I needed. Hence, no magnifying class, pen, or wood saw. In spite of keeping to a minimum, this is a big (and expensive) tool. Still, it is probably the model I would recommend if you simply have to have a well-equipped Swiss Army knife for daily use.

  • QUALITY: Beautiful finish and quality of build.
  • PERFORMANCE: Not up to frequent use or tough jobs.
  • PROS: Sharp cutting surfaces, red color makes it easy to locate and difficult to misplace, relatively smooth profile in pocket, good assortment of useful tools (including pliers) and nice touches (like the toothpick).
  • CONS: Big as many other more robust pocket tools, scissors only good for hangnails and loose threads, expensive.
  • VALUE: These usually sell for more than $50 and you can purchase some pretty nice pocket tools for that much money. Many of the alternatives are actually intended for hard work.
  • OVERALL OPINION: Despite tales of travelers being able to fix their cars or perform some mechanical marvel with just a Swiss Army knife, the Tradesman is not really up to most day-to-day work. One of the Leatherman Juice models will hold up better and probably cost less. It's a neat tool to have, but not my first choice if I need to take a pocket tool camping or on an overnight trip.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Swiss+Tech Micro-Plus
    8-in-1

    I'm sorry...there's something fundamentally unnatural about a pocket tool that not only doesn't have a knife blade, but doesn't even have a sharp edge. Don't reach for one of these to open a Tyvek envelope. The Micro-Plus 8-in-1 has a very good set of pliers, but that's about the only thing to recommend it for my use. The pliers work great on bolt heads and nuts, since they are pretty robust. The riveted hinge in the middle of each handle makes me nervous when I apply pressure, but most pocket tools have a pivot point in the handle, so perhaps I'm being an old lady about this. On the other hand, most other tools have the pivot pin, screw, or rivet running across the handle, perpendicular to the direction of force, while the rivet on this tool runs in the direction you squeeze, placing a lot of pressure on the heads of the rivets. In any case, I've never had one of these break in normal use. I've bought a couple dozen of these and the Micro-Tech 6-in-1 as "stocking-stuffers" at Christmas. They're fairly inexpensive and you can usually get a price break ordering six or more on-line. The screwdrivers are adequate, but nothing to brag about. The tool is perhaps one of the most compact you can imagine, folding away to virtually nothing. This may be a good choice if you are already carrying a decent knife and just want a pair of pliers and some screwdrivers handy.

  • QUALITY: Older units may be a bit rough, but the newer ones I've received are very nicely-finished. The blades and riveted hinges seem to hold up normal use.
  • PERFORMANCE: Works fine for the purpose intended. The handles may tend to try to swing closed when you put pressure on the jaws of the pliers, but this is pretty easy to avoid. The fold-out screwdrivers may also want to fold in when used.
  • PROS: Robust, very compact, neat method of attaching to key chain or ring, durable finish, inexpensive.
  • CONS: Limited blades (none) and tools, no knife blade, pliers are intended for heavy work only, handles tends to swing closed when pliers are used, riveted hinges in handles make me nervous (probably for no good reason).
  • VALUE: These are pretty inexpensive, so they really do offer good value for the money.
  • OVERALL OPINION: If you already carry a knife or a light pocket tool (for example, a Swiss Army Classic), this could be a good choice. But its limited functions tend to keep it at the bottom of my personal list.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Swiss+Tech Micro-Tech
    6-in-1

    See my comments above on the Micro-Plus 8-in-1 about the lack of a knife blade. The Micro-Tech 6-in-1 has a very good set of pliers, but that's about the only thing to recommend it for my use. The pliers work great on bolt heads and nuts, since they are pretty robust. The riveted hinge in the middle of each handle makes me nervous when I apply pressure, but most pocket tools have a pivot point in the handle, so perhaps I'm being an old lady about this. On the other hand, most other tools have the pivot pin, screw, or rivet running across the handle, perpendicular to the direction of force, while the rivet on this tool runs in the direction you squeeze, placing a lot of pressure on the heads of the rivets. In any case, I've never had one of these break in normal use. I've bought several of these and the Micro-Plus 8-in-1 as "stocking-stuffers" at Christmas. They're fairly inexpensive and you can usually get a price break ordering six or more on-line. The screwdrivers are adequate, but nothing to brag about. Unlike the Micro-Plus 8-in-1, which has two folding screwdrivers, this tool has only the shaped ends of the handles to use for screws. The likelihood that one or the other will not fit your particular screw head is pretty high. The tool is perhaps one of the most compact you can imagine, folding away to virtually nothing. This may be a good choice if you are already carrying a decent knife and just want a pair of pliers and some screwdrivers handy.

  • QUALITY: Older units may be a bit rough, but the newer ones I've received are very nicely-finished. The blades and riveted hinges seem to hold up normal use.
  • PERFORMANCE: Works fine for the purpose intended. The handles may tend to try to swing closed when you put pressure on the jaws of the pliers, but this is pretty easy to avoid. The fold-out screwdrivers may also want to fold in when used.
  • PROS: Robust, very compact, neat method of attaching to key chain or ring, durable finish, inexpensive.
  • CONS: Limited blades (none) and tools (two screwdriver tips), no knife blade, pliers are intended for heavy work only, handles tends to swing closed when pliers are used, riveted hinges in handles make me nervous (probably for no good reason).
  • VALUE: These are pretty inexpensive, so they really do offer good value for the money.
  • OVERALL OPINION: If you already carry a knife or a light pocket tool (for example, a Swiss Army Classic), this could be a good choice. But its limited functions tend to keep it at the bottom of my personal list.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Pocket Tool Name

    Description.

  • QUALITY: Quality comments.
  • PERFORMANCE: Performance comments.
  • PROS: List of pros.
  • CONS: List of cons.
  • VALUE: Comments on values.
  • OVERALL OPINION: Overall opinion.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Pocket Tool Name

    Description.

  • QUALITY: Quality comments.
  • PERFORMANCE: Performance comments.
  • PROS: List of pros.
  • CONS: List of cons.
  • VALUE: Comments on values.
  • OVERALL OPINION: Overall opinion.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

    Pocket Tool Name

    Description.

  • QUALITY: Quality comments.
  • PERFORMANCE: Performance comments.
  • PROS: List of pros.
  • CONS: List of cons.
  • VALUE: Comments on values.
  • OVERALL OPINION: Overall opinion.
  • Back to list of pocket tools.

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